fbpx

How to Use PowerShell to Escape Double Quotes? 2 Best Ways

In PowerShell, quotation marks are used to enclose strings in either single (‘) or double quotation marks (“). You can escape double quotes string in PowerShell using the backtick operator (‘).

Use PowerShell to Escape Double Quotes

Additionally, the backtick (‘) operator can also escape strings that contain single quotes. In order to print the string and double quotes in the output, this process is carried out. In this tutorial, I will go over, using examples, how to escape single and double quotes in PowerShell.

Different Kinds Of Quotes: Use Single Quote And Double Quotes In Powershell)

Single and double quotes are the two forms of quotes that can be used in PowerShell. You will learn a little bit about quotations in this post, as well as how to escape double quotes in PowerShell.

The difference between the two that matters most can make or destroy a script. Knowing these distinctions will improve your ability to develop PowerShell scripts and prevent a relatively easy error.

1. ‘Single Quote’ 

When writing or troubleshooting PowerShell programs, you will most frequently employ and run across single quote strings.

Think about the following instance:

# Assign a variable with a value of like 'alpha'.
$Var = 'alpha'
# Assign a variable with a value of like 'alpha'.
$Var = 'alpha'
# Put the variable into another string value.
Write-Host -Message 'testing $Var quotes.'
# Put the variable into another string value.
Write-Host -Message 'testing $Var quotes.'

In the example above, PowerShell disregards $Var and treats the variable exactly as it was typed: $Var. Here, there is no exchange.

However, how can you make PowerShell understand the variable value contained within a quoted string value? Keep reading to know about it.

2. “Double Quotes” In PowerShell

String values gain a dynamic component when enclosed in double quotations. This kind of string quote will appear when the string contains dynamic data from variables that are either dynamically created or kept in memory.


Think about the following instance:

Create a variable with a simple value.
$Var = 'example'
Create a variable with a simple value.
$Var = 'example'
Write-Host -Message "testing the $Var quotes."
Write-Host -Message "testing the $Var quotes."

Due to the double-quoted string enclosing $Var in the aforementioned situation, PowerShell processes it. PowerShell will parse text (the variable) that is preceded by a dollar sign when it sees double quotes, and it will replace the variable name with the appropriate value.

Methods to Use PowerShell to Escape Double Quotes

1. Use Double Quotes To Escape Characters in PowerShell

Let’s talk about escaping double quotes in strings, which is a more complex topic. Making non-literal elements literal is referred to as “escapement.”

What happens when literal double quotes are required inside of a string now that you are aware that double quotes extend variables inside of strings? In that instance, either use single quotes or Escape Double Quotes.

Take the following example, where you need to generate a string with double quotes inside of it. Note that the word “string” as it stands does not actually contain double quotes.

"String"
"String"

There are two ways to add double quotes within a string. Either put your string inside single quotes or use the backtick sign to get it out of double quotation marks. Below is a demonstration of both ways to escape double quotes using PowerShell.

You’ll notice that “string” now has double quotes around it.

'"string"'
'"string"'

 

"`"string`""
"`"string`""

2.  Example Ff Quote Characters

Let’s imagine you need to develop a quick function to provide a team member with some very basic information:

Date / Time
Disk % Used
Disk % free

The time and date must be shown as being current. Consider the functionality of this string value. By following the right patterns, we can utilize the Get-Date cmdlet and the Uformat option to provide us with the necessary date and time:

$date = Get-Date
$date = Get-Date

The first section of the script is finished. I must now collect some disk information to output to the terminal as well. The proportion of available space is the major metric I’m searching for. I’ll use Write-Host to display this data once more, but this time I’ll need to put some more code inside the double-quoted string.

Keep in mind that this data will change over time. In the following example, I’ll first construct a variable and then use a member type property to retrieve the desired value:

$disk = Get-PSdrive C
$disk
$disk = Get-PSdrive C
$disk

Now that we have two variables, we can use them to modify the strings that the operator will see when this function is called. So let’s put the pieces together to create the complete script that will serve as our function:

function Get-CurrentDiskPercentageUsed {
    $date = Get-Date -UFormat "%m / %d / %Y:"
    $disk = Get-DiskSpace | Where-Object -Property Name -EQ 'C:\'
    Write-Host "Storage report for $date"
    Write-Host -ForegroundColor Yellow "There is $($disk.PercentFree)% total disk space remaining."
}

The $() subexpression operator is evaluated by PowerShell as a whole subexpression before the outcome is replaced. By using this method, you can also avoid needing to add more variables, which can save memory and even speed up your script.

It still needs some improvement. So let’s add additional arithmetic to the end of it to give the operator a complete calculation:

function Get-CurrentDiskPercentageUsed {
    $date = Get-Date -UFormat "%m / %d / %Y:"
    $disk = Get-DiskSpace | Where-Object -Property Name -EQ 'C:\'
    Write-Host "Storage report for $date"
    Write-Host -ForegroundColor Red "There is $(100 - $disk.PercentFree)% total disk utilization on drive $($disk.Name)."
    Write-Host -ForegroundColor Yellow "There is $($disk.PercentFree)% total disk space remaining."
 }