How To Deploy Web Parts In Sharepoint 2007

Are you looking to enhance the functionality of your SharePoint 2007 site? Follow this comprehensive guide to learn how to deploy web parts effectively.

To deploy web parts in SharePoint 2007, developers can write custom ASP.NET web parts and then install them. This requires testing and approval of the code before deployment. The web parts can be deployed to the SharePoint server’s bin directory or to the Global Assembly Cache (GAC).

The bin directory is a partial-trust location with default low-level code access security permissions, while the GAC allows for global deployment of signed assemblies with full trust by default. Security attributes can be set for web parts deployed in the bin directory.

The deployment process can be done manually by copying the DLL to the bin folder and modifying the Web.config file, or through PowerShell using a CAB solution package. Additionally, web parts can be added to the Web Part Gallery by creating a .webpart file.

Overall, the process involves building and deploying the web part assembly, updating the Web.config file, and adding the web part to the Web Part Gallery.

Deploying Custom Web Parts in SharePoint 2007

To deploy custom ASP.NET web parts in SharePoint 2007, it is crucial to follow the proper procedures and ensure that the code goes through thorough testing and approval. This section will guide you through the deployment process, from writing and installing custom web parts to the importance of testing and approval before deployment.

Writing and Installing Custom Web Parts

Before deploying a custom web part, it must be developed using ASP.NET and tailored to meet the specific requirements of your SharePoint site. Once the web part has been coded, it can be installed by packaging it into a solution file, which contains all the necessary information and files for deployment.

To install the custom web part, navigate to the Solutions Gallery in SharePoint’s Site Settings and upload the solution file. After successful installation, you can add the web part to your site’s pages by editing them and selecting the custom web part from the web part selector.

Testing and Approval Before Deployment

Prior to deploying a custom web part, it is essential to test its functionality and ensure that it aligns with your organization’s standards. Thorough testing helps identify any issues or bugs that may arise during deployment or usage. This step ensures a smooth experience for users and safeguards against any potential disruptions.

Additionally, obtaining approval from the appropriate stakeholders is crucial to ensure that the custom web part meets all necessary criteria and complies with organizational guidelines. By gaining their approval, you can guarantee that the web part is aligned with the overall objectives of your SharePoint site and that it adheres to the established design principles.

Deployment Method Description
Manual Deployment This method involves copying the web part’s DLL file to the SharePoint server’s bin directory and modifying the Web.config file to register the custom web part. It provides flexibility but requires manual handling of files.
PowerShell Deployment Using PowerShell, you can deploy the custom web part using a Cabinet (CAB) solution package. This method automates the deployment process and allows for easier management of multiple web parts.
Adding to Web Part Gallery You can add the custom web part to the Web Part Gallery by creating a .webpart file. This simplifies the process of adding the web part to pages, as it can be easily selected from the web part selector.

In conclusion, deploying custom ASP.NET web parts in SharePoint 2007 requires careful planning, thorough testing, and approval from stakeholders. By following the proper procedures, you can ensure a successful deployment and enhance the functionality and usability of your SharePoint site.

Deploying Web Parts to the Bin Directory or GAC

Web parts in SharePoint 2007 can be deployed either to the bin directory, which provides partial-trust deployment, or to the Global Assembly Cache (GAC), offering global deployment with full trust. When deploying to the bin directory, the web parts are stored in a specific folder where the SharePoint server can access them. This method is suitable for web parts that require low-level code access security permissions. On the other hand, deploying web parts to the GAC allows for the deployment of signed assemblies that have full trust by default.

It is important to note that the bin directory is a partial-trust location by default, meaning that it has restricted access to system resources and requires code access security permissions for web parts. These permissions can be set using the SharePoint administration tools to ensure that the web parts have the necessary access to function properly. In contrast, the GAC provides global deployment of assemblies, allowing them to be shared across multiple web applications without the need for specific code access security permissions.

When deploying web parts to the bin directory, the process can be done manually or through PowerShell using a CAB (Cabinet) solution package. Manual deployment involves copying the web part’s DLL file to the appropriate bin folder on the SharePoint server and modifying the Web.config file to register the web part. PowerShell, on the other hand, provides a more automated approach, allowing developers to package and deploy the web part using scripts.

Deployment Method Description
Manual Deployment Copy the web part’s DLL file to the bin directory and modify the Web.config file.
PowerShell Deployment Package and deploy the web part using PowerShell scripts.

Additionally, web parts can be added to the Web Part Gallery by creating a .webpart file. This allows users to easily add and customize web parts within the SharePoint user interface. The .webpart file contains the necessary information and configuration settings for the web part. By adding the file to the Web Part Gallery, users can quickly select and deploy the web part without the need for developer intervention.

Summary

Deploying web parts in SharePoint 2007 offers two main options: the bin directory and the Global Assembly Cache (GAC). The bin directory provides partial-trust deployment with low-level code access security permissions, while the GAC offers global deployment with full trust. Developers can choose from manual deployment or PowerShell methods to deploy web parts to the bin directory. Web parts can also be added to the Web Part Gallery for easy selection and deployment by users. Understanding the deployment options and methods is crucial in ensuring the successful integration and functionality of web parts in SharePoint 2007.

Different Deployment Methods and Adding to Web Part Gallery

The deployment of web parts in SharePoint 2007 can be achieved through different methods, including manual deployment and utilizing PowerShell or CAB solution packages. Manual deployment involves the process of copying the DLL files to the SharePoint server’s bin directory and modifying the Web.config file. This method provides developers with more control over the deployment process, allowing them to customize the configuration settings and security attributes for the web parts.

Alternatively, PowerShell can be used to streamline the deployment process. By creating a CAB solution package, developers can package the necessary files and scripts and deploy them through PowerShell commands. This method offers automation and scalability, enabling faster and more efficient deployment of web parts.

In addition to manual deployment and PowerShell, web parts can also be added to the Web Part Gallery. This feature allows for easy access and management of web parts within SharePoint 2007. By creating a .webpart file, developers can define the properties and settings for the web part, and then add it to the gallery for users to easily discover and utilize.

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