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Boost Your Productivity with PowerShell Get-Process: A Comprehensive Guide

In PowerShell, the Get-Process cmdlet allows you to retrieve information about the running processes on a system. This powerful command is particularly useful for managing system resources and troubleshooting issues related to application performance.

By leveraging Get-Process, you can easily view detailed information about processes running on your system, such as process names, IDs, memory usage, and more. In this article, we’ll explore the capabilities of Get-Process and how to use it effectively in your PowerShell scripts.

What can the Get Process do in PowerShell?

  1. Showing the Running Processes
  2. Detecting Certain Process Attributes
  3. Recovering the Memory Usage for Processes
  4. Other Properties of Get-Process
    1. Pinpointing a Process Binary location
    2. Discovering Process Owners
  5. Discovering Processes on a Remote Computer

Using the Get-Process Cmdlet in PowerShell

Showing the Running Processes

In PowerShell, the Get-Process cmdlet is used to display a list of running processes on a local or remote computer. This cmdlet retrieves information about the processes running on a computer, including the process name, process ID (PID), memory usage, CPU usage, and other process-specific details.

To use Get-Process, simply open PowerShell and type the cmdlet followed by any desired parameters. For example, Get-Process -Name "chrome" will display all processes with the name “chrome”.

Showing the Running Processes

Detecting Certain Process Attributes

In PowerShell, you can use the Get-Process cmdlet to retrieve information about running processes on a system. In addition to displaying a list of running processes, Get-Process it can also be used to find specific process attributes.

To find specific process attributes, you can use the -IncludeUserName, -FileVersion, and -Module parameters, among others. For example, to find all processes owned by the user “John”, you can use the following command:

Get-Process | Where-Object { $_.UserName -eq "John" }
Detecting Certain Process Attributes

Recovering the Memory Usage for Processes

Retrieving process memory usage is a common task in monitoring and troubleshooting scenarios. PowerShell’s Get-Process cmdlet provides an easy way to retrieve the memory usage of a process.

By default, the Get-Process cmdlet retrieves a set of properties that includes the process ID, name, and CPU usage. To retrieve the memory usage of a process, you can use the WorkingSet or PrivateMemorySize64 properties.

The WorkingSet property returns the amount of physical memory in bytes that the process has allocated and is using. The PrivateMemorySize64 property returns the amount of private memory in bytes that the process has allocated and is using. Private memory is the memory that is not shared with other processes and is typically used for data that is specific to the process.

Here’s an example of how to retrieve the memory usage of a specific process:

Get-Process -Id 1234 | Select-Object Id, Name, WorkingSet, PrivateMemorySize64
Recovering the Memory Usage for Processes

This command retrieves the process with ID 1234 and displays its ID, name, working set, and private memory size in bytes. You can replace the process ID with a process name or use other filters to retrieve specific processes.

Other Properties of Get-Process

Pinpointing a Process Binary location

In PowerShell, the Get-Process cmdlet can be used to not only retrieve information about running processes but also to discover where a process binary (executable file) lives. This information can be useful in troubleshooting or analyzing a system.

To discover where a process binary lives, we can use the Path property of the process object returned by Get-Process. For example, to retrieve the path of the explorer.exe process, we can use the following command:

(Get-Process explorer).Path
Pinpointing a Process Binary location

This will return the file path of the explorer.exe binary, such as C:\Windows\explorer.exe.

Discovering Process Owners

Finding the Process Owner means identifying the user account that launched and is currently running a particular process. In PowerShell, this can be achieved by using the Get-WmiObject cmdlet along with the Win32_Process WMI class.

The Win32_Process class contains a property called GetOwner that can be used to retrieve the owner of a process. Here’s an example:

Get-WmiObject Win32_Process | ForEach-Object {
    $owner = $_.GetOwner()
    [PSCustomObject]@{
        Name = $_.Name
        ProcessId = $_.ProcessId
        Owner = $owner.User
    }
}
Discovering Process Owners

This script retrieves a list of all running processes and displays their name, process ID, and owner’s user name. The GetOwner method returns a Win32_UserAccount object that contains the owner’s user name and domain name. In this example, we are only interested in the user name, so we retrieve the User property of the returned object.

Discovering Processes on a Remote Computer

When managing multiple computers, it can be useful to be able to view and manage processes on remote machines. PowerShell’s Get-Process cmdlet can also be used to retrieve information about processes running on a remote computer by using the -ComputerName parameter.

For example, to get the list of processes running on a remote computer named “Server01”, you would use the following command:

Get-Process -ComputerName Server01
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This will retrieve the list of running processes on the remote computer, just as if you were running the command on the local machine.

In conclusion, the Get-Process cmdlet is a powerful tool for managing and monitoring processes in Windows using PowerShell. With its versatility and ease of use, the Get-Process cmdlet is a must-have for any PowerShell user.