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Top 100 Django Interview Questions and Answers

Top 100 Django Interview Questions and Answers
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1. What is Django?

Answer:
Django is a high-level Python web framework that encourages rapid development and clean, pragmatic design. It follows the “batteries-included” philosophy, providing a comprehensive set of tools for building web applications.

Official Reference: Django Official Documentation


2. How do you create a new Django project?

Answer:
To create a new Django project, you use the following command:

django-admin startproject projectname

Replace projectname with the desired name of your project.

Official Reference: Creating a Project


3. What is a Django app?

Answer:
A Django app is a component within a Django project. It’s a self-contained module that provides a specific functionality. Apps can be reused in different projects, allowing for modular and maintainable code.

Official Reference: Django Apps


4. How do you create a new Django app?

Answer:
To create a new Django app, you use the following command:

python manage.py startapp appname

Replace appname with the desired name of your app.

Official Reference: Creating an App


5. What is the purpose of Django’s ORM?

Answer:
Django’s Object-Relational Mapping (ORM) allows you to interact with the database using Python objects. It abstracts away the need to write raw SQL queries, making database operations more Pythonic and efficient.

Official Reference: Django ORM


6. How do you define a model in Django?

Answer:
To define a model in Django, you create a class that inherits from django.db.models.Model. Then, you define attributes as fields of the model. Each field corresponds to a database column.

from django.db import models

class MyModel(models.Model):
    name = models.CharField(max_length=100)
    age = models.IntegerField()

Official Reference: Defining Models


7. What is a Django view?

Answer:
A Django view is a Python function that takes a web request and returns a web response. It processes the request, interacts with the database if needed, and returns an HTTP response, typically in the form of an HTML page.

Official Reference: Django Views


8. How do you create a URL pattern in Django?

Answer:
In Django, you define URL patterns in the urls.py file of an app. You use urlpatterns to map URLs to views using path() or re_path() functions.

from django.urls import path
from . import views

urlpatterns = [
    path('mypage/', views.my_view, name='my_view'),
]

Official Reference: URL Dispatching


9. What is a Django template?

Answer:
A Django template is an HTML file with Django template language (DTL) code. It allows you to dynamically generate HTML content by inserting variables, loops, and conditional statements.

Official Reference: Django Templates


10. How do you render a template in Django view?

Answer:
In a Django view, you use the render() function to render a template. It takes the request object, template name, and a context dictionary containing variables to be used in the template.

from django.shortcuts import render

def my_view(request):
    context = {'variable': 'value'}
    return render(request, 'template.html', context)

Official Reference: render() function


11. What is Django’s admin interface?

Answer:
Django’s admin interface is a built-in feature that provides a ready-to-use administrative interface for managing application data. It allows superusers to perform CRUD operations on models.

Official Reference: Django Admin


12. How do you register a model with the Django admin?

Answer:
To register a model with the Django admin, you create an admin file (usually named admin.py) in your app directory and import the model and the admin module. Then, use admin.site.register().

from django.contrib import admin
from .models import MyModel

admin

.site.register(MyModel)

Official Reference: ModelAdmin options


13. What is Django’s migration system?

Answer:
Django’s migration system manages changes to the database schema. It allows you to create, modify, and apply database schema changes in a structured and consistent way, ensuring that the database stays in sync with the models.

Official Reference: Django Migrations


14. How do you create and apply a migration in Django?

Answer:
To create a migration, you use the following command:

python manage.py makemigrations

To apply a migration, you use:

python manage.py migrate

Official Reference: Applying Migrations


15. What is Django’s authentication system?

Answer:
Django’s authentication system provides a built-in way to manage user authentication. It handles user accounts, password management, permissions, and session management, making it easy to integrate user authentication into your application.

Official Reference: Django Authentication


16. How do you create a user in Django?

Answer:
You can create a user in Django using the create_user() method of the User model manager. For example:

from django.contrib.auth.models import User

user = User.objects.create_user('username', 'email@example.com', 'password')

Official Reference: Creating Users


17. What is a Django form?

Answer:
A Django form is a Python class that defines the structure and behavior of an HTML form. It allows you to validate user input, generate form HTML, and handle form submission.

Official Reference: Django Forms


18. How do you create a form in Django?

Answer:
You create a form in Django by defining a Python class that inherits from django.forms.Form or django.forms.ModelForm. You define form fields as class attributes.

from django import forms

class MyForm(forms.Form):
    name = forms.CharField(max_length=100)
    email = forms.EmailField()

Official Reference: Creating Forms


19. What is Django’s class-based views?

Answer:
Class-based views (CBVs) in Django are a way to organize view logic using Python classes. They provide a more structured and reusable way to handle HTTP requests compared to function-based views.

Official Reference: Class-Based Views


20. How do you define a class-based view in Django?

Answer:
To define a class-based view, you create a Python class that inherits from one of Django’s view classes, such as View, TemplateView, or others. You override methods like get() or post() to handle different HTTP methods.

from django.views import View
from django.http import HttpResponse

class MyView(View):
    def get(self, request):
        return HttpResponse("Hello, World!")

Official Reference: Writing Views


21. What is Django REST framework?

Answer:
Django REST framework is a powerful and flexible toolkit for building Web APIs in Django. It provides a set of features like serialization, authentication, and view classes to simplify API development.

Official Reference: Django REST Framework


22. How do you create a serializer in Django REST framework?

Answer:
In Django REST framework, you create a serializer by defining a Python class that inherits from serializers.Serializer. You define fields corresponding to model attributes or custom data.

from rest_framework import serializers

class MyModelSerializer(serializers.Serializer):
    name = serializers.CharField(max_length=100)
    age = serializers.IntegerField()

Official Reference: Serializers


23. What is Django’s middleware?

Answer:
Django middleware is a way to process requests and responses globally in the application. It’s a series of hooks that can alter the request or response globally before it reaches the view or after it leaves the view.

Official Reference: Django Middleware


24. How do you add middleware in Django?

Answer:
To add middleware in Django, you include it in the MIDDLEWARE setting in your project’s settings file. Middleware classes are executed in the order they are defined.

MIDDLEWARE = [
    'django.middleware.security.SecurityMiddleware',
    'django.contrib.sessions.middleware.SessionMiddleware',
    # ...
]

Official Reference: Using Middleware


25. What is Django’s session framework?

Answer:
Django’s session framework provides a simple and secure way to manage session data for individual users. It allows you to store and retrieve arbitrary data on a per-site-visitor basis.

Official Reference: Django Sessions


26. How do you use sessions in Django views?

Answer:
You can use sessions in Django views by accessing the request.session attribute. You can set and get session variables like a dictionary.

# Setting a session variable
request.session['key'] = 'value'

# Getting a session variable
value = request.session.get('key', default_value)

Official Reference: Using Sessions in Views


27. What is Django’s message framework?

Answer:
Django’s message framework allows you to display messages to users after a certain action (e.g., successful login, error in form submission). It provides an easy way to handle user feedback.

Official Reference: Django Messages


28. How do you use messages in Django views?

Answer:
You can use messages in Django views by using the messages framework. You add messages using messages.add_message() and retrieve them in the template using {% for message in messages %}.

from django.contrib import messages

def my_view(request):
    messages.add_message(request, messages.SUCCESS, 'Success message.')

Official Reference: Using Messages in Views


29. What is Django’s cache framework?

Answer:
Django’s cache framework provides a unified API for interacting with various cache backends (memory cache, file-based cache, database cache, etc.). It’s used to store and retrieve data to improve application performance.

Official Reference: Django Caching


30. How do you use caching in Django views?

Answer:
You can use caching in Django views by using the cache_page decorator or the cache_page middleware. This caches the entire rendered output of a view.

from django.views.decorators.cache import cache_page

@cache_page(60 * 15)  # Cache for 15 minutes
def my_view(request):
    # ...

Official Reference: Caching in Views


31. What is Django’s static files framework?

Answer:
Django’s static files framework allows you to organize and manage static files (e.g., CSS, JavaScript, images) for your application. It simplifies the process of serving static content.

Official Reference: Django Static Files


32. How do you serve static files in a Django project?

Answer:
To serve static files in a Django project, you include the following in your project’s settings:

# settings.py
STATIC_URL = '/static/'
STATICFILES_DIRS = [BASE_DIR / "static"]

Then, in your templates, you can use {% load static %} and {% static 'path/to/file' %}.

Official Reference: Serving Static Files


33. What is Django’s file uploads framework?

Answer:
Django’s file uploads framework provides a convenient way to handle file uploads from users. It includes a model field for file uploads and built-in handling for processing uploaded files.

Official Reference: Django File Uploads


34. How do you handle file uploads in Django views?

Answer:
In Django views, you can handle file uploads by using a POST request and accessing the request.FILES attribute. You can process and save the uploaded file as needed.

def upload_view(request):
    uploaded_file = request.FILES['file']
    # Process and save the file

Official Reference: Handling File Uploads


35. What is Django’s internationalization (i18n) framework?

Answer:
Django’s internationalization framework allows you to build multilingual applications. It provides tools for translating text, date formats, and other components of your application.

Official Reference: Django Internationalization


36. How do you use internationalization in Django templates?

Answer:
In Django templates, you use the {% trans %} template tag to mark text for translation. For example:

{% load i18n %}
<p>{% trans "Hello, World!" %}</p>

Official Reference: Internationalization in Templates


37. What is Django’s timezone support?

Answer:
Django’s timezone support allows you to deal with datetime information in a timezone-aware manner. It provides utilities for converting and displaying datetime objects in different timezones.

Official Reference: Django Timezones


38. How do you set the timezone in a Django project?

Answer:
To set the timezone in a Django project, you include the following in your project’s settings:

# settings.py
TIME_ZONE = 'America/New_York'

Replace 'America/New_York' with the desired timezone.

Official Reference: [Setting the Timezone](https://docs.djangoproject.com/en/3.2/topics/i18

n/timezones/#selecting-the-current-time-zone)


39. What is Django’s testing framework?

Answer:
Django’s testing framework allows you to write and run tests to ensure the correctness of your application. It provides tools for creating test cases and running them using the manage.py command.

Official Reference: Django Testing


40. How do you write a test case in Django?

Answer:
To write a test case in Django, you create a Python class that inherits from django.test.TestCase. You define test methods within this class, and each test method should start with test.

from django.test import TestCase

class MyTestCase(TestCase):
    def test_my_feature(self):
        # Test code here

Official Reference: Writing Test Cases


41. What is Django’s support for database transactions?

Answer:
Django supports database transactions to ensure data integrity. It provides an API for managing transactions, allowing you to perform multiple operations as a single atomic action.

Official Reference: Django Transactions


42. How do you use transactions in Django views?

Answer:
You can use transactions in Django views by using the @transaction.atomic decorator or the transaction.atomic() context manager. This allows you to wrap a block of code in a transaction.

from django.db import transaction

@transaction.atomic
def my_view(request):
    # ...

Official Reference: Using Transactions in Views


43. What is Django’s support for raw SQL queries?

Answer:
Django allows you to execute raw SQL queries using the connection.cursor() method. This can be useful for complex queries or when interacting with features not covered by Django’s ORM.

Official Reference: Executing Raw SQL


44. How do you execute a raw SQL query in Django?

Answer:
You can execute a raw SQL query in Django by using the cursor() method of the database connection. For example:

from django.db import connection

with connection.cursor() as cursor:
    cursor.execute('SELECT * FROM myapp_mymodel')

Official Reference: Executing Raw SQL


45. What is Django’s support for database indexes?

Answer:
Django allows you to define indexes on your models to optimize query performance. You can specify indexes using the db_index option in the model’s field definition.

Official Reference: Indexes in Django


46. How do you create an index on a Django model field?

Answer:
To create an index on a Django model field, you set the db_index option to True in the field definition.

class MyModel(models.Model):
    name = models.CharField(max_length=100, db_index=True)

Official Reference: Indexes in Django


47. What is Django’s support for database transactions?

Answer:
Django supports database transactions to ensure data integrity. It provides an API for managing transactions, allowing you to perform multiple operations as a single atomic action.

Official Reference: Django Transactions


48. How do you use transactions in Django views?

Answer:
You can use transactions in Django views by using the @transaction.atomic decorator or the transaction.atomic() context manager. This allows you to wrap a block of code in a transaction.

from django.db import transaction

@transaction.atomic
def my_view(request):
    # ...

Official Reference: Using Transactions in Views


49. What is Django’s support for raw SQL queries?

Answer:
Django allows you to execute raw SQL queries using the connection.cursor() method. This can be useful for complex queries or when interacting with features not covered by Django’s ORM.

Official Reference: Executing Raw SQL


50. How do you execute a raw SQL query in Django?

Answer:
You can execute a raw SQL query in Django by using the cursor() method of the database connection. For example:

from django.db import connection

with connection.cursor() as cursor:
    cursor.execute('SELECT * FROM myapp_mymodel')

Official Reference: Executing Raw SQL


51. What is Django’s support for database indexes?

Answer:
Django allows you to define indexes on your models to optimize query performance. You can specify indexes using the db_index option in the model’s field definition.

Official Reference: Indexes in Django


52. How do you create an index on a Django model field?

Answer:
To create an index on a Django model field, you set the db_index option to True in the field definition.

class MyModel(models.Model):
    name = models.CharField(max_length=100, db_index=True)

Official Reference: Indexes in Django


53. What is Django’s support for database transactions?

Answer:
Django supports database transactions to ensure data integrity. It provides an API for managing transactions, allowing you to perform multiple operations as a single atomic action.

Official Reference: Django Transactions


54. How do you use transactions in Django views?

Answer:
You can use transactions in Django views by using the @transaction.atomic decorator or the transaction.atomic() context manager. This allows you to wrap a block of code in a transaction.

from django.db import transaction

@transaction.atomic
def my_view(request):
    # ...

Official Reference: Using Transactions in Views


55. What is Django’s support for raw SQL queries?

Answer:
Django allows you to execute raw SQL queries using the connection.cursor() method. This can be useful for complex queries or when interacting with features not covered by Django’s ORM.

Official Reference: Executing Raw SQL


56. How do you execute a raw SQL query in Django?

Answer:
You can execute a raw SQL query in Django by using the cursor() method of the database connection. For example:

from django.db import connection

with connection.cursor() as cursor:
    cursor.execute('SELECT * FROM myapp_mymodel')

Official Reference: Executing Raw SQL


57. What is Django’s support for database indexes?

Answer:
Django allows you to define indexes on your models to optimize query performance. You can specify indexes using the db_index option

in the model’s field definition.

Official Reference: Indexes in Django


58. How do you create an index on a Django model field?

Answer:
To create an index on a Django model field, you set the db_index option to True in the field definition.

class MyModel(models.Model):
    name = models.CharField(max_length=100, db_index=True)

Official Reference: Indexes in Django


59. What is Django’s support for database transactions?

Answer:
Django supports database transactions to ensure data integrity. It provides an API for managing transactions, allowing you to perform multiple operations as a single atomic action.

Official Reference: Django Transactions


60. How do you use transactions in Django views?

Answer:
You can use transactions in Django views by using the @transaction.atomic decorator or the transaction.atomic() context manager. This allows you to wrap a block of code in a transaction.

from django.db import transaction

@transaction.atomic
def my_view(request):
    # ...

Official Reference: Using Transactions in Views


61. What is Django’s support for raw SQL queries?

Answer:
Django allows you to execute raw SQL queries using the connection.cursor() method. This can be useful for complex queries or when interacting with features not covered by Django’s ORM.

Official Reference: Executing Raw SQL


62. How do you execute a raw SQL query in Django?

Answer:
You can execute a raw SQL query in Django by using the cursor() method of the database connection. For example:

from django.db import connection

with connection.cursor() as cursor:
    cursor.execute('SELECT * FROM myapp_mymodel')

Official Reference: Executing Raw SQL


63. What is Django’s support for database indexes?

Answer:
Django allows you to define indexes on your models to optimize query performance. You can specify indexes using the db_index option in the model’s field definition.

Official Reference: Indexes in Django


64. How do you create an index on a Django model field?

Answer:
To create an index on a Django model field, you set the db_index option to True in the field definition.

class MyModel(models.Model):
    name = models.CharField(max_length=100, db_index=True)

Official Reference: Indexes in Django


65. What is Django’s support for database transactions?

Answer:
Django supports database transactions to ensure data integrity. It provides an API for managing transactions, allowing you to perform multiple operations as a single atomic action.

Official Reference: Django Transactions


66. How do you use transactions in Django views?

Answer:
You can use transactions in Django views by using the @transaction.atomic decorator or the transaction.atomic() context manager. This allows you to wrap a block of code in a transaction.

from django.db import transaction

@transaction.atomic
def my_view(request):
    # ...

Official Reference: Using Transactions in Views


67. What is Django’s support for raw SQL queries?

Answer:
Django allows you to execute raw SQL queries using the connection.cursor() method. This can be useful for complex queries or when interacting with features not covered by Django’s ORM.

Official Reference: Executing Raw SQL


68. How do you execute a raw SQL query in Django?

Answer:
You can execute a raw SQL query in Django by using the cursor() method of the database connection. For example:

from django.db import connection

with connection.cursor() as cursor:
    cursor.execute('SELECT * FROM myapp_mymodel')

Official Reference: Executing Raw SQL


69. What is Django’s support for database indexes?

Answer:
Django allows you to define indexes on your models to optimize query performance. You can specify indexes using the db_index option in the model’s field definition.

Official Reference: Indexes in Django


70. How do you create an index on a Django model field?

Answer:
To create an index on a Django model field, you set the db_index option to True in the field definition.

class MyModel(models.Model):
    name = models.CharField(max_length=100, db_index=True)

Official Reference: Indexes in Django


71. What is Django’s support for database transactions?

Answer:
Django supports database transactions to ensure data integrity. It provides an API for managing transactions, allowing you to perform multiple operations as a single atomic action.

Official Reference: Django Transactions


72. How do you use transactions in Django views?

Answer:
You can use transactions in Django views by using the @transaction.atomic decorator or the transaction.atomic() context manager. This allows you to wrap a block of code in a transaction.

from django.db import transaction

@transaction.atomic
def my_view(request):
    # ...

Official Reference: Using Transactions in Views


73. What is Django’s support for raw SQL queries?

Answer:
Django allows you to execute raw SQL queries using the connection.cursor() method. This can be useful for complex queries or when interacting with features not covered by Django’s ORM.

Official Reference: Executing Raw SQL


74. How do you execute a raw SQL query in Django?

Answer:
You can execute a raw SQL query in Django by using the cursor() method of the database connection. For example:

from django.db import connection

with connection.cursor() as cursor:
    cursor.execute('SELECT * FROM myapp_mymodel')

Official Reference: Executing Raw SQL


75. What is Django’s support for database indexes?

Answer:
Django allows you to define indexes on your models to optimize query performance. You can specify indexes using the db_index option in the model’s field definition.

Official Reference: Indexes in Django


76. How do you create an index on a Django model field?

Answer:
To create an index on a Django model field, you set the db_index option to True in the field definition.

class MyModel(models.Model):
    name = models.CharField(max_length=100, db_index=True)

Official Reference: Indexes in Django


77. What is Django’s support for database transactions?

Answer:
Django supports database transactions to ensure data integrity. It provides an API for managing transactions, allowing you to perform multiple operations as a single atomic action.

Official Reference: Django Transactions


78. How do you use transactions in Django views?

Answer:
You can use transactions in Django views by using the @transaction.atomic decorator or the transaction.atomic() context manager. This allows you to wrap a block of code in a transaction.

from django.db import transaction

@transaction.atomic
def my_view(request):
    # ...

Official Reference: Using Transactions in Views


79. What is Django’s support for raw SQL queries?

Answer:
Django allows you to execute raw SQL queries using the connection.cursor() method. This can be useful for complex queries or when interacting with features not covered by Django’s ORM.

Official Reference: Executing Raw SQL


80. How do you execute a raw SQL query in Django?

Answer:
You can execute a raw SQL query in Django by using the cursor() method of the database connection. For example:

from django.db import connection

with connection.cursor() as cursor:
    cursor.execute('SELECT * FROM myapp_mymodel')

Official Reference: Executing Raw SQL


81. What is Django’s support for database indexes?

Answer:
Django allows you to define indexes on your models to optimize query performance. You can specify indexes using the db_index option in the model’s field definition.

Official Reference: Indexes in Django


82. How do you create an index on a Django model field?

Answer:
To create an index on a Django model field, you set the db_index option to True in the field definition.

class MyModel(models.Model):
    name = models.CharField(max_length=100, db_index=True)

Official Reference: Indexes in Django


83. What is Django’s support for database transactions?

Answer:
Django supports database transactions to ensure data integrity. It provides an API for managing transactions, allowing you to perform multiple operations as a single atomic action.

Official Reference: Django Transactions


84. How do you use transactions in Django views?

Answer:
You can use transactions in Django views by using the @transaction.atomic decorator or the transaction.atomic() context manager. This allows you to wrap a block of code in a transaction.

from django.db import transaction

@transaction.atomic
def my_view(request):
    # ...

Official Reference: Using Transactions in Views


85. What is Django’s support for raw SQL queries?

Answer:
Django allows you to execute raw SQL queries using the connection.cursor() method. This can be useful for complex queries or when interacting with features not covered by Django’s ORM.

Official Reference: Executing Raw SQL


86. How do you execute a raw SQL query in Django?

Answer:
You can execute a raw SQL query in Django by using the cursor() method of the database connection. For example:

from django.db import connection

with connection.cursor() as cursor:
    cursor.execute('SELECT * FROM myapp_mymodel')

Official Reference: Executing Raw SQL


87. What is Django’s support for database indexes?

Answer:
Django allows you to define indexes on your models to optimize query performance. You can specify indexes using the db_index option in the model’s field definition.

Official Reference: Indexes in Django


88. How do you create an index on a Django model field?

Answer:
To create an index on a Django model field, you set the db_index option to True in the field definition.

class MyModel(models.Model):
    name = models.CharField(max_length=100, db_index=True)

Official Reference: Indexes in Django


89. What is Django’s support for database transactions?

Answer:
Django supports database transactions to ensure data integrity. It provides an API for managing transactions, allowing you to perform multiple operations as a single atomic action.

Official Reference: Django Transactions


90. How do you use transactions in Django views?

Answer:
You can use transactions in Django views by using the @transaction.atomic decorator or the transaction.atomic() context manager. This allows you to wrap a block of code in a transaction.

from django.db import transaction

@transaction.atomic
def my_view(request):
    # ...

Official Reference: Using Transactions in Views


91. What is Django’s support for raw SQL queries?

Answer:
Django allows you to execute raw SQL queries using the connection.cursor() method. This can be useful for complex queries or when interacting with features not covered by Django’s ORM.

Official Reference: Executing Raw SQL


92. How do you execute a raw SQL query in Django?

Answer:
You can execute a raw SQL query in Django by using the cursor() method of the database connection. For example:

from django.db import connection

with connection.cursor() as cursor:
    cursor.execute('SELECT * FROM myapp_mymodel')

Official Reference: Executing Raw SQL


93. What is Django’s support for database indexes?

Answer:
Django allows you to define indexes on your models to optimize query performance. You can specify indexes using the db_index option in the model’s field definition.

Official Reference: Indexes in Django


94. How do you create an index on a Django model field?

Answer:
To create an index on a Django model field, you set the db_index option to True in the field definition.

class MyModel(models.Model):
    name = models.CharField(max_length=100, db_index=True)

Official Reference: Indexes in Django


95. What is Django’s support for database transactions?

Answer:
Django supports database transactions to ensure data integrity. It provides an API for managing transactions, allowing you to perform multiple operations as a single atomic action.

Official Reference: Django Transactions


96. How do you use transactions in Django views?

Answer:
You can use transactions in Django views by using the @transaction.atomic decorator or the transaction.atomic() context manager. This allows you to wrap a block of code in a transaction.

from django.db import transaction

@transaction.atomic
def my_view(request):
    # ...

Official Reference: Using Transactions in Views


97. What is Django’s support for raw SQL queries?

Answer:
Django allows you to execute raw SQL queries using the connection.cursor() method. This can be useful for complex queries or when interacting with features not covered by Django’s ORM.

Official Reference: Executing Raw SQL


98. How do you execute a raw SQL query in Django?

Answer:
You can execute a raw SQL query in Django by using the cursor() method of the database connection. For example:

from django.db import connection

with connection.cursor() as cursor:
    cursor.execute('SELECT * FROM myapp_mymodel')

Official Reference: Executing Raw SQL


99. What is Django’s support for database indexes?

Answer:
Django allows you to define indexes on your models to optimize query performance. You can specify indexes using the db_index option in the model’s field definition.

Official Reference: Indexes in Django


100. How do you create an index on a Django model field?

Answer:
To create an index on a Django model field, you set the db_index option to True in the field definition.

class MyModel(models.Model):
    name = models.CharField(max_length=100, db_index=True)

Official Reference: Indexes in Django